A Look at 5 Charities That Aim to Help Afghans with Disabilities

A growing number of organizations are seeking to make life easier for Afghans with disabilities. Recognizing that Afghanistan is not the most easily accessible place for people with disabilities, these organizations aim to integrate these vulnerable individuals into Afghan society, which offers little in the way of infrastructure or systems to facilitate the daily lives of those with mobility difficulties or visual impairments. In addition, there are few services in Afghanistan that provide assistance and support to people with disabilities. However, the following organizations are seeking to ensure that Afghans with disabilities obtain the assistance that they need.

1. Humanity & Inclusion

Humanity and Inclusion

Formerly known as Handicap International (and still operating programs in Afghanistan under this name), Humanity & Inclusion (HI) has been working in Afghanistan for more than 30 years. Focused primarily on helping people injured by landmines, the organization accomplishes its mission in two ways. The first is through the direct provision of assistance and other support services. At its rehabilitation center in Kandahar, for example, HI offers physiotherapy sessions and produces support equipment such as prostheses and mobility aids. The second way is through extensive advocacy work: HI works with the government of Afghanistan and other national institutions to improve access to care for people with disabilities and to ensure that action plans based on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities are properly coordinated. HI also supports local—often smaller—disability rights organizations by connecting them with potential partners and raising their concerns with local political leaders.

2. Tearfund

Tearfund

Based in the UK, Tearfund is a charity whose international work seeks to lift people out of poverty, overcome the effects of disasters, and deliver support to some of the world’s most vulnerable and marginalized populations. Since 1971, Tearfund has been supporting humanitarian work in Afghanistan. Active in 10 Afghan provinces, the charity partners with five local organizations to deliver its programming. One of its key focus areas is advocating for Afghans with disabilities. Through this work, Tearfund seeks to transform attitudes and end the stigma surrounding disabilities, as well as establish inclusive communities where people of different ability levels can live together on equal footing. In addition, the charity runs educational support programs and works with one of its local partners to help Afghanistan develop a more inclusive educational policy. As a result, more children with disabilities are now attending school than ever before.

3. Development and Ability Organization (DAO)

Development and Ability Organization

Founded in 2004, the Afghan-led DAO is one of the organizations recently certified by the Afghanistan Institute for Civil Society. A vocal advocate for disability rights, DAO aims to build a more inclusive society by increasing awareness of disability issues among the general public and the Afghan government. The organization’s current projects include physical rehabilitation activities, community dialogue initiatives, and the publication of a disability issues newsletter in three languages. In the future, DAO intends to expand its activities to include providing small support loans to people with disabilities and creating vocational training programs so that people vulnerable individuals can acquire vocational skills and earn an income.

4. Children in Crisis

Kids in Crisis

With the mission of bringing education, care, and protection to the world’s most vulnerable children, the UK nonprofit Children in Crisis has considerable experience working in remote regions. In Afghanistan, some of the “forgotten” children who are most in need are those with disabilities. Many families in Afghanistan simply don’t have the resources or knowledge to provide proper care and support to children with disabilities. As a result, it’s not uncommon for them to experience neglect, abuse, and even abandonment. In order to address this issue, Children in Crisis runs the In-Home Care Project, which aims to provide the families of children with disabilities with the resources and tools they need to become better caregivers. The program staff works with parents and family members to develop a personal care plan for each child and to provide initial medical care, physiotherapy, and materials. Ultimately, through the project’s training, families will be better equipped and capable of handling these responsibilities themselves.

5. Afghanistan International Foundation for the Blind (AIFB)

AFIB logo

Founded in 2009, AIFB is committed to its mission of improving and enhancing the lives of those Afghans in need affected by blindness. By collaborating and partnering with other international organizations, AIFB offers services and programs in the areas of education, health, rehabilitation, and community services for people affected by blindness and visual impairments. AIFB’s vision includes the use of Braille books and blind-based computer technologies in Afghan classrooms, services to help people with blindness to access employment and higher education, and support for prescriptions and health procedures.

Get to Know the ARTF with These 4 Important Questions

The Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF) is one of the most important funding entities supporting the ongoing rebuilding and development process in Afghanistan. Learn more about this critical organization with the following four frequently asked questions:

 

  1. What is the ARTF?

ARTFlogoEstablished in 2002, the ARTF is a multidonor trust fund that is managed by the World Bank and currently supported by 34 international donors. Since 2016, these donors have contributed more than US$9 billion for reconstruction projects and service delivery programs all across Afghanistan. The ARTF is the most important multidonor mechanism for nonsecurity, on-budget support in Afghanistan, and it is by far the preferred vehicle for pooled international funding. Its centrally administered structure allows for the well-coordinated and coherent channeling of funds, provides the Government of Afghanistan with funding predictability, and offers excellent transparency and high accountability for its donors, along with low overhead and transaction costs.

 

 

  1. How is the ARTF managed and governed?

There are three tiers of governance within the ARTF. Combined with three additional working groups, this management framework is both sound and flexible, allowing the ARTF to quickly and consistently adapt to changing circumstances and development priorities. The three-tiered governance framework includes the following entities:

The ARTF Steering Committee—This committee sets the strategic direction for the ARTF at quarterly meetings chaired by the World Bank and the Afghan Minister of Finance. Members of the committee are all either ARTF donors or representatives from the World Bank and the Afghan Ministry of Finance. To ensure transparency, the Steering Committee publicly posts full notes of its meetings on the ARTF website.

The ARTF Management Committee—The Management Committee is responsible for implementing the vision and direction set by the Steering Committee. This includes reviewing and approving funding proposals, reviewing ARTF finances, and making recommendations on ARTF management. Members of the Management Committee include the Afghan Ministry of Finance, the Islamic Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the United Nations Development Program, and the World Bank, with the United Nations Assistance Mission to Afghanistan taking part as an observer.

The ARTF Administrator—The World Bank serves as the Administrator for the ARTF. As such, it is responsible for monitoring and reporting on all aspects of ARTF performance. In particular, the World Bank ensures that the allocation of funds takes place in accordance with the Financing Strategy set and agreed upon by donors and the Government of Afghanistan, and in line with established fiduciary standards and performance measures.

The working groups that support the three tiers of governance are the Incentive Program Working Group, a donor group that works to set policy benchmarks for the ARTF with the Government of Afghanistan; the Strategy Group, which reviews the Financing Strategy and its implementation; and the Gender Working Group.

 

  1. How is the ARTF aligned with government priorities?

Working and collaborating closely with the Government of Afghanistan is a key priority for the ARTF; likewise, the government’s relationship with the ARTF is one of its most valued partnerships. Unlike some donor agencies that never give local governments the opportunity to work with funding directly, the ARTF channels all funds through government systems, and all projects are implemented by ministries and government agencies.

Naturally, such a close relationship means that ARTF’s work is closely aligned with the Afghanistan National Development Strategy outlined by the government. In 2010, the government established 22 National Priority Programs (NPPs) and reached an agreement with the ARTF that a minimum of 80% of donor assistance would go towards supporting these priorities. This has proved to be the most effective way for the international community to support Afghanistan’s own development goals. To date, the ARTF has been an instrumental player in many of Afghanistan’s biggest development achievements.

Beyond questions of funding, the ARTF is also a helpful resource for the Government of Afghanistan in that it provides the government with an important platform for dialogue around key policy reforms.

 

 

  1. How are ARTF funds allocated?

There are two different “windows” through which ARTF funds are allocated. The first is the Recurrent Cost window: under this funding avenue, the government receives an annual reimbursement for a predetermined portion of eligible and non-security-related operating expenditure. This recurrent cost funding is an important element of Afghanistan’s fiscal sustainability; while the government is progressively improving its own revenue base through activities like customs and taxation, it is not yet able to fully support its recurrent expenditures with domestic revenues alone. ARTF Recurrent Cost window funding helps provide consistency and stability as the government works to improve its own revenue collection processes. To date, nearly 75% of recurrent costs have fallen into the category of payroll expenses, including wages for teachers and health workers.

The second ARTF funding window is the Investment window: this funding avenue provides grant-based financing for investments that support the National Priority Programs described earlier.