Everything You Need to Know about the Bayat Foundation

The Bayat Foundation supports people in need throughout Afghanistan, providing clothing, food, medical care, and much more. The Bayat Foundation was established in 2006. Its ultimate mission is to foster a healthy, hopeful population, providing Afghans with the inspiration and opportunities they need to succeed and prosper.

It was founded with the objective of rebuilding Afghan communities and supporting the neediest and most at-risk. The Bayat Foundation supports Afghans in a variety of ways, providing food and clothing; maternity care; postnatal support for women and babies; educational support; orphan care; and youth sports programs.

In this article, we look at the history of the Bayat Foundation and the vital work the organization carries out across Afghanistan.

The Bayat Foundation supports families in need.

Since 2008, the Bayat Foundation runs two programs dedicated to supporting Afghan families in need: Winter Aid and Family Sponsorship.

During the coldest months of the year, warm clothing, food, and thousands of blankets are distributed to families in remote provinces of Afghanistan through the Bayat Foundation’s Winter Aid program.

Through the Family Sponsorship initiative, donors pledge $50 per month to provide the necessities to a family in need. Rather than spending their days on the streets in search of food, Afghan children are able to attend school because of the Family Sponsorship program.

afghanistan children

The Bayat Foundation provides postnatal care for mothers and babies.

Over the past few years, the Bayat Foundation has overseen construction of healthcare facilities in eight separate Afghan provinces. Previously, no formal care options existed in those areas for pregnant women and new mothers.

The new facilities incorporate maternity clinics comprising up to 150 beds. These clinics are capable of serving hundreds of thousands of Afghan women each year, free of charge. As a result of the Bayat Foundation’s efforts, the mortality rate for Afghan women and newborns has decreased.

The Bayat Foundation provides educational support and orphan care.

The Bayat Foundation has overseen remodeling and refurbishment of classrooms and dormitories across the country as well as providing much-needed school supplies. The organization has also constructed several new schools, libraries, and orphanages. It also built a sports stadium. These efforts provide a safe environment for Afghan children to learn in, helping increase literacy throughout the country by educating one child at a time.

During August 2019, the Bayat Foundation’s School and Student Assistance Program built new school facilities in Kabul. It also provided school equipment, incorporating 5,000 types of school supplies, including pencils, notebooks, shoes, backpacks, and prepackaged nutritious meals.

The Bayat Foundation also educates civilians across Afghanistan through public service announcements on a variety of different topics. These include food hygiene, personal hygiene, human rights issues, and respect for elders and youths.

The Bayat Foundation launched the American University of Afghanistan Scholars Program.

The Bayat Foundation is Afghanistan’s biggest private non-profit education, health, and social development organization. The Foundation demonstrated its enduring commitment to increasing opportunities for the youth of Afghanistan by launching its Scholars Program at the American University of Afghanistan in April 2019. Its mission is to promote a new generation of exceptional, highly-skilled IT professionals to lead technical innovation and entrepreneurship throughout Afghanistan in years to come.

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Every year, 15 scholarships will be awarded under the Bayat Scholars Program to qualified candidates who successfully complete the application process. The program will enable prospective undergraduates to study at the American University of Afghanistan and obtain a bachelor’s degree in either computer science or information communication technology.

To qualify for the program, candidates must be Afghan citizens with a high school diploma. They should be proficient speakers of English and possess a strong academic record. Qualifying students must commit to utilizing their education for the betterment of Afghanistan.

The Bayat Foundation provides disaster response, emergency relief, fresh water, and nutritious food.

The Bayat Foundation has provided emergency aid to flooding and avalanche victims, delivering medical aid, food, clothing, and other vital support in the aftermath of regional disasters. Additionally, thanks to the organization’s deep well-digging initiatives, more people throughout Afghanistan enjoy access to clean, safe drinking water today.

Each year, The Bayat Foundation Food Assistance Program initiative provides hundreds of thousands of nutritious meals to families throughout Afghanistan. Every Bayat Foundation meal kit provides pre-packaged, easy-to-prepare meals that are shelf stable and fortified with vitamins, proteins, and other key nutrients.

The Bayat Foundation partners with local schools to ensure its programs reach as many families as possible. To date, more than 172,800 pre-packaged meals have been distributed to families and children throughout Kabul and the surrounding regions.

The Bayat Foundation sponsors sporting events.

The Foundation sponsors a variety of different sporting events, including bicycle races, distance running, and walk-a-thons. Its aim is to inspire young people throughout Afghanistan to take part in competitive sports and team-building exercises.

This New Project Is Improving Health Care Quality in Afghanistan

As Afghanistan works to rebuild itself after many years of conflict, the country’s health care system remains an area of concern. Despite recent significant improvements, access to health care remains a challenge for many Afghans, particularly those living in remote or rural communities. In addition, the outdated infrastructure, lack of critical amenities and facilities, and inadequate opportunities for medical training that are standard in most parts of Afghanistan mean that it can be difficult for providers to deliver health care beyond the most basic services.

However, Afghanistan’s health care system is set to get a major boost over the next few years through the Sehatmandi Project, a large-scale program launched in the summer of 2018 that aims to improve access to and quality of health care services across the country. Here are four things you need to know about this important project.

It will cover the entire country.

Many of the development programs or initiatives that deal with health care in Afghanistan do so in very targeted areas, often concentrating either on Kabul or on rural areas in the north of the country. The Sehatmandi Project is exceptional in that its scope includes 31 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces. This means that Afghans all around the country will be able to benefit from the cohesive and holistic improvements to Afghanistan’s health care system that the project aims to implement. In addition, some of the project’s key focus areas include offering underserved populations beneficial services such as nutrition management and family planning programs.

afghanistan

It is supported by a variety of national and international partners.

The Sehatmandi Project is a major, multi-year initiative with a budget to match: the total cost for the program’s three years of operation is estimated at US$600 million.

This cost will be covered by grants from three major funding entities:

The Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF)—Established in 2002, this multidonor trust fund is supported by 34 international donors under the overall management of the World Bank. It is one of the most important entities supporting Afghanistan’s ongoing rebuilding and development process.

The International Development Association (IDA)—Another arm of the World Bank, the IDA provides loans and grants to some of the world’s poorest countries, with the aim of boosting economic growth and lifting these nations out of poverty.

The Global Financing Facility (GFF)—This multi-stakeholder partnership helps governments of low- and lower-middle income countries to prioritize and finance their citizens’ health and nutrition.

In addition to these three major funders, the Sehatmandi Project involves many other administrative and operational partners, including Afghanistan’s Ministry of Public Health and Health Works, a global NGO based in the Netherlands.

It aims to build on the successes of a previous program.

The Sehatmandi Project is a follow-up to the System Enhancement for Health Action in Transition (SEHAT) program, another initiative operated by Afghanistan’s Ministry of Public Health and supported by IDA and ARTF.

Running from January 2014 to June 2018, SEHAT aimed to expand the scope, quality, and coverage of health care services provided to Afghans, especially vulnerable and underserved populations. A key goal of SEHAT was to allow health facilities across Afghanistan to deliver a basic package of health service (BPHS) and an essential package of hospital service (EPHS). The successes of the SEHAT program have laid an important foundation for the Sehatmandi Project, which can now pick up where the earlier program left off and take its accomplishments to the next level.

Some of the most important achievements of the SEHAT program include the following:

Better health services in Nangarhar province—SEHAT oversaw new health initiatives in each of Nangarhar province’s 22 districts. For example, with the support of the SEHAT program, personnel at the Kama District Hospital were able to upgrade their skills and provide better care to patients, and the hospital itself received a second ambulance and a power generator.

The Kabul Urban Health Project—The Rahman Mina Hospital, a Kabul hospital that serves hundreds of thousands of the city’s residents, benefited from extensive renovations and new equipment provided under SEHAT. In addition, the hospital was able to increase its supply of critical medicines, and hospital staff received training on a new health management information system, which improved the facility’s operational efficiency.

It now includes a pay-for-performance component.

In early 2019, Aga Khan Health Services (AKHS) took over the management of health care facilities in two Afghan provinces under the umbrella of the Sehatmandi Project. In this new role, AKHS will be responsible for two provincial hospitals, five district hospitals, 24 comprehensive health centers, 158 basic and primary health centers, and more than 1,000 village health posts in the provinces of Bamyan and Badakhshan.

Interestingly, AKHS plans to operate its portion of the health system using a pay-for-performance model, which will see health service providers compensated for meeting pre-established benchmarks, including numbers of antenatal and postnatal care visits, numbers of immunized infants, and quantity and quality of major surgeries.

A Look at 5 Charities That Aim to Help Afghans with Disabilities

A growing number of organizations are seeking to make life easier for Afghans with disabilities. Recognizing that Afghanistan is not the most easily accessible place for people with disabilities, these organizations aim to integrate these vulnerable individuals into Afghan society, which offers little in the way of infrastructure or systems to facilitate the daily lives of those with mobility difficulties or visual impairments. In addition, there are few services in Afghanistan that provide assistance and support to people with disabilities. However, the following organizations are seeking to ensure that Afghans with disabilities obtain the assistance that they need.

1. Humanity & Inclusion

Humanity and Inclusion

Formerly known as Handicap International (and still operating programs in Afghanistan under this name), Humanity & Inclusion (HI) has been working in Afghanistan for more than 30 years. Focused primarily on helping people injured by landmines, the organization accomplishes its mission in two ways. The first is through the direct provision of assistance and other support services. At its rehabilitation center in Kandahar, for example, HI offers physiotherapy sessions and produces support equipment such as prostheses and mobility aids. The second way is through extensive advocacy work: HI works with the government of Afghanistan and other national institutions to improve access to care for people with disabilities and to ensure that action plans based on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities are properly coordinated. HI also supports local—often smaller—disability rights organizations by connecting them with potential partners and raising their concerns with local political leaders.

2. Tearfund

Tearfund

Based in the UK, Tearfund is a charity whose international work seeks to lift people out of poverty, overcome the effects of disasters, and deliver support to some of the world’s most vulnerable and marginalized populations. Since 1971, Tearfund has been supporting humanitarian work in Afghanistan. Active in 10 Afghan provinces, the charity partners with five local organizations to deliver its programming. One of its key focus areas is advocating for Afghans with disabilities. Through this work, Tearfund seeks to transform attitudes and end the stigma surrounding disabilities, as well as establish inclusive communities where people of different ability levels can live together on equal footing. In addition, the charity runs educational support programs and works with one of its local partners to help Afghanistan develop a more inclusive educational policy. As a result, more children with disabilities are now attending school than ever before.

3. Development and Ability Organization (DAO)

Development and Ability Organization

Founded in 2004, the Afghan-led DAO is one of the organizations recently certified by the Afghanistan Institute for Civil Society. A vocal advocate for disability rights, DAO aims to build a more inclusive society by increasing awareness of disability issues among the general public and the Afghan government. The organization’s current projects include physical rehabilitation activities, community dialogue initiatives, and the publication of a disability issues newsletter in three languages. In the future, DAO intends to expand its activities to include providing small support loans to people with disabilities and creating vocational training programs so that people vulnerable individuals can acquire vocational skills and earn an income.

4. Children in Crisis

Kids in Crisis

With the mission of bringing education, care, and protection to the world’s most vulnerable children, the UK nonprofit Children in Crisis has considerable experience working in remote regions. In Afghanistan, some of the “forgotten” children who are most in need are those with disabilities. Many families in Afghanistan simply don’t have the resources or knowledge to provide proper care and support to children with disabilities. As a result, it’s not uncommon for them to experience neglect, abuse, and even abandonment. In order to address this issue, Children in Crisis runs the In-Home Care Project, which aims to provide the families of children with disabilities with the resources and tools they need to become better caregivers. The program staff works with parents and family members to develop a personal care plan for each child and to provide initial medical care, physiotherapy, and materials. Ultimately, through the project’s training, families will be better equipped and capable of handling these responsibilities themselves.

5. Afghanistan International Foundation for the Blind (AIFB)

AFIB logo

Founded in 2009, AIFB is committed to its mission of improving and enhancing the lives of those Afghans in need affected by blindness. By collaborating and partnering with other international organizations, AIFB offers services and programs in the areas of education, health, rehabilitation, and community services for people affected by blindness and visual impairments. AIFB’s vision includes the use of Braille books and blind-based computer technologies in Afghan classrooms, services to help people with blindness to access employment and higher education, and support for prescriptions and health procedures.