Spotlight on the Bayat Foundation’s Families in Need Program

Dedicated to the education, wellbeing, and health of Afghanistan’s people, the Bayat Foundation strives to help Afghans flourish irrespective of gender, ethnicity, age, religion, or marital status. The foundation was established with the aim of unlocking the potential of every man, woman, and child through a variety of national and regional initiatives.

In this article, we look at the impact of the Bayat Foundation’s Families in Need campaign, which addresses the unique challenges of Afghan families in some of the country’s most remote communities.

The Bayat Foundation supports at-risk families

The Bayat Foundation

Through Bayat Family funds, support from partner NGOs throughout Afghanistan, and the generous support of its patrons, the Bayat Foundation has established numerous campaigns designed to improve the standards of living and prospects for tens of thousands of Afghan families.

In the winter of 2008-09, the Bayat Foundation initiated a Winter Aid program, providing life-saving aid packages containing flour, blankets, and oil to at-risk households throughout many provinces, including Kabul, Sar-e-pul, Faryab, Badakhshan, and Khost.

The Bayat Foundation provided Ramadan assistance in response to COVID-19

As part of its activities to counter the spread of the virus and reduce the negative economic and societal impact, the Bayat Foundation coordinated the distribution of food and essential items across Afghanistan throughout the month of Ramadan.

The packages provided aid to vulnerable families to numerous Afghan provinces, delivering essential items to thousands of displaced workers and their families at a time of unprecedented need.

The Bayat Foundation was founded by Dr. Ehsan Bayat and Mrs. Fatema Bayat

It was established with the mission of creating opportunities for families across Afghanistan. As the founder of the Bayat Group, a parent company of several highly profitable Afghan enterprises in the telecom, media, logistics, industrial infrastructure, and security sectors, Dr. Bayat has implemented at his companies stringent corporate social responsibility policies designed to support sustainable development throughout Afghanistan.

A holdings company, the Bayat Group has subsidiaries including the Ariana Television and Radio Network, Ariana Network Services, Afghan Wireless, and Bayat Energy. With such a large reach, the Bayat Group is uniquely placed to reach communities throughout Afghanistan today.

Through its subsidiaries, the group has helped redefine key sectors of industry, and it is credited with making a significant difference to the Afghan economy. Through its charitable initiatives, the Bayat Group has made a difference in the everyday lives of Afghan citizens.

Afghan Wireless connects millions of Afghan customers at home and abroad. The Ariana Television and Radio Network has helped showcase Afghan culture and arts, providing informative, entertaining, and enlightening programming for viewers across Afghanistan and beyond.

Building on the group’s strong reputation of corporate giving, the Bayat Foundation’s highly effective charitable outreach programs have improved the lives of thousands of Afghans, supporting the nation’s elderly and disadvantaged while simultaneously stimulating national growth via investment in frontier markets, such as gas and oil exploration, development, and production.

The Bayat Foundation is also committed to Afghan children and youth. It invests in medical facilities to ensure healthy births, helps build new schools to provide quality education, and assists in the development of world-class industries and a state-of-the-art communications infrastructure to provide the next generation of Afghans with increased career opportunities.

Among the Bayat Foundation’s considerable achievements over the last 20 years is the construction of 14 hospitals serving over 1.5 million Afghan children and mothers. During the harsh Afghan winter, the Bayat Foundation’s Winter Aid program delivers precious food supplies, warm clothing, and thousands of blankets to families living in Afghanistan’s remotest regions.

The Bayat Foundation is committed to providing continued support to communities throughout Afghanistan, helping the country regain its rightful place as a political, economic, and cultural leader in Central Asia. As Mrs. Fatema Bayat explains, serving Afghans is at the very heart of all of the Bayat Foundation’s activities.

Founded in 2006, the Bayat Foundation strives to improve the lives of millions of Afghans, providing food, clothing, entrepreneurship programs, athletics, orphan care, and much more, delivering support and inspiration to at-risk Afghans.

The Bayat Foundation launched its Family Sponsorship program in 2008

Through the initiative, donors pledge $65 per month to support Afghan families in need. The impact of this modest donation is potentially life-changing. It negates the need for children to beg on the streets, enabling them to attend school, vastly increasing their educational opportunities, and with it, their career prospects and lifetime potential.

The Bayat Foundation has helped lower Afghan maternal and infant mortality rates

Over the past few years, the Bayat Foundation has coordinated the construction of healthcare facilities throughout eight Afghan provinces, providing maternal and newborn care facilities where none existed previously. These 150-bed hospitals serve hundreds of thousands of Afghan women per year, providing life-saving maternity care—for free, in many cases.

Everything You Need to Know about Traditional Afghan Cuisine

Largely based on seasonal produce, dry goods such as wheat, rice, barley, and maize, and dairy products such as milk, whey, and yogurt, Afghan cuisine is often described as a fusion between Indian and Middle Eastern cookery. In this article, we look at a selection of revered Afghan dishes and their place in Afghan history.

Rice Dishes

Rice is the most important cultural component of most Afghan meals, and a great deal of time and effort is expended in creating rice dishes. Wealthy Afghan families typically consume one rice dish each day. In times gone by, royal Afghan households committed much time to the invention and preparation of elaborate rice dishes, as evidenced by the plethora available in Afghanistan today. Family gatherings such as weddings and holiday celebrations typically incorporate several rice dishes, with the reputations of Afghan cooks made and broken by their skill with rice preparation.

There are several different types of Afghan rice recipes. Challow rice, for instance, is traditionally served with qormah, casseroles, and stews. Challow is white rice that is boiled in saltwater before being drained and baked in an oven.

rice

Kabuli palaw, Afghanistan’s national dish, is cooked in the same way as challow, but it is prepared with meat and stock and infused with herbs and spices before being baked. This result is an elaborate dish comprising a variety of flavors, colors, and aromas. Caramelized sugar is often incorporated into the rice, lending the dish a rich brown color. Created for upper-class families of Kabul, Kabuli palaw is topped with carrots, almonds, and raisins before serving.

To make zamarod palaw, spinach is added before the dish is baked, resulting in a rich emerald hue. Meanwhile, narenj palaw is a sweet, elaborate dish, made with chicken, saffron, almonds, pistachios, and orange peel.

Shola is a traditional Afghan dish that calls for sticky, short-grain rice. It is prepared in both sweet and savory versions, with the latter becoming increasingly popular in recent years. Savory shola often features split peas or mashed mung beans, as well as meats such as lamb or beef. The dish is particularly popular during the Afghan wintertime, when it is often served with quroot (a type of dried curd), a glass of plain yogurt, and a fresh vegetable salad. There are many different versions of shola available across Afghanistan today, and the dish is also popular throughout the Middle East, particularly in Iran, where various other ingredients are commonly incorporated in its preparation.

Mastawa, another rice dish traditionally prepared in the winter, incorporates short-grain rice and sun-dried mutton simmered in an aromatic broth infused with onions, garlic, mint, turmeric, and cilantro. Bitter orange peel and hot peppers are added near the end of cooking to make this sticky rice dish fragrant, hearty, and spicy.

Meat Dishes

Qormah is a popular dish throughout Afghanistan, with more than 100 different variations, including:

  • Qormah e nadroo: A lamb or veal dish served in an onion-based sauce, incorporating lotus roots, cilantro, and yogurt.
  • Qormah e lawand: A traditional dish prepared with lamb, chicken, or beef, and cooked with onions, turmeric, yogurt, and cilantro.
  • Qormah e gosht: Translated as “meat qormah,” this dish is a commonly served accompaniment to the palaw rice that is popular at gatherings.
  • Qormah e alou-bokhara wa dalnakhod: A fruitier take on qormah featuring chicken or veal and prepared with onions, lentils, cardamom, and sour plums.
  • Qormah e sabzi: A fusion of lamb and sautéed spinach and greens.
  • Qormah e shalgham: A sweet and sour recipe prepared with lamb, turnips, onions, and sugar.

Mantu is a highly popular native dumpling dish. Since it is time consuming to prepare, it is often reserved for special occasions and large gatherings such as weddings. Dumplings are filled with onions and ground beef or lamb before being steamed. The dish is sometimes served in a tomato sauce topped with a mixture of yogurt, split chickpeas, and garlic. Ashak is another traditional dumpling dish. Originating in Kabul, it is made with leeks, sautéed tomatoes, ground meat, a garlic-yogurt sauce, and red kidney beans.

Kebabs are popular from Europe to the Middle East to India. In Afghanistan, they are served by restaurants as well as street vendors. Every Afghan restaurant has its own unique take on the dish. Traditionally made of lamb, kebabs are often served with naan bread, or sometimes rice, and customers often sprinkle sumac on the dish. The quality of a kebab is said to hinge on the quality of meat it was made from, with pieces of fat from the tail of the sheep often added to lamb skewers to improve the flavor.

Afghan Desserts

Believed to have originated in India, firnee is a traditional dish that is made from cornstarch, milk, and sugar and flavored with rosewater and aromatic spices like cardamom and saffron.

Haft mewa is sweet Afghan soup made from dried fruit and nuts that is traditionally eaten during the Afghan New Year celebrations, when it is often enjoyed at breakfast time.

9 of the Best Afghan Dishes

With its delicate flavor combinations, bold colors, and Persian, Chinese, Indian, and Mediterranean influences, Afghan cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the United States. Read on to learn more about some of Afghanistan’s most celebrated dishes.

1. Ashak

Ashak is a type of dumpling stuffed with leeks and served with a meat, yogurt, or garlic-mint sauce. However, each region, and often family, has its own variation of the dish, leading to a huge variety of types.

Typically served for family gatherings and holidays or on a Friday to mark the end of the week, ashak is regarded as a celebratory dish.

ashak
Image by jypsygen | Flickr

2. Jalebi

This sweet snack, popular throughout South Asia and the Middle East, is made from a batter of maida flour, which is fashioned in circular or pretzel shapes before being deep-fried and then soaked in sugar syrup.

Jalebi has a chewy consistency, with a crystallized sugar coating. Lime juice, citric acid, or rosewater are sometimes added for flavor.

3. Shorwa

This hearty dish translates from Persian to English simply as “soup.” A humble, slow-cooked dish, shorwa is perfect for a winter’s night. Its main ingredients are potatoes, beans, and meat, such as lamb, chicken, or beef.

Shorwa is a traditional dish that is eaten throughout Afghanistan. It is often flavored with tomatoes, onions, cilantro, and turmeric, and it is usually served with bread.

Shorwa
Image by Jeff Kubina | Flickr

4. Qabili palau

A great deal of thought and effort goes into Afghanistan’s national dish, qabili palau. Its origins lie in the upper echelons of Kabul society, since it was accessible only to those families that could afford nuts, raisins, and carrots to flavor their rice. Over time, more people in Afghanistan became wealthier, and the dish became mainstream.

Known as the crown of Afghan cuisine, qabili palau is a meat and rice dish made with lamb, chicken, or beef. Chefs flavor the dish with a fusion of spices, including cinnamon, cloves, cumin, cardamom, and turmeric.

The word qabili comes from the Dari word qabil, meaning “well accomplished.” The inference is that only a skilled chef can make a good qabili palau, as one must carefully balance the ingredients to create the perfect blend of delicate flavors.

5. Bolani

Bolani is an Afghan flatbread stuffed with a vegetable filling, then baked or fried.

Bolani can incorporate a variety of fillings, including potatoes, pumpkin, lentils, and leeks. Accompaniments include plain or mint-flavored yogurt.

Bolani is popular on special occasions in Afghanistan, and it is commonly served in kebab restaurants throughout America today.

6. Mantu

Mantu is a type of meat dumpling that is incredibly popular in Afghanistan. It is usually made with lamb or beef and cooked in a multilayer steamer.

Afghans cook mantu on special occasions, but it is also sold by vendors in busy streets and markets. It can be an accompaniment or a main meal.

The dish dates back to the Mongols of Central Asia. Historians believe Mongol horsemen carried frozen mantu with them as they traveled during the cold winters, boiling them over campfires to eat for supper.

Mantu
Image by Lance Nishihira | Flickr

7. Qormah          

An onion- and tomato-based casserole or stew, qormah is often the main dish at gatherings.

To prepare the dish, first the onions are fried, and tomatoes are added later. Depending on the recipe, a variety of vegetables, fruits, and spices may be included, followed by the main ingredient, usually meat. It is usually served with chalau rice.

There are more than 100 variations of qormah, including Qormah e Sabzi, featuring lamb, spinach, and greens; Qormah e Alou-Bokhara wa Dalnakhod, which includes veal or chicken, onions, sour plums, lentils, and cardamom; and Qormah e Shalgham, featuring lamb, onions, turnip, and sugar.

8. Sheer khurma

Sheer khurma is a rich vermicelli pudding made from milk, dates, nuts, and sugar. The literal translation into English is “milk with dates.” It is popular during the Islamic festival of Eid across Afghanistan, Central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent.

Made with whole milk, the dessert dish is rich and creamy. It comprises a variety of dried nuts and fruits, including dates, raisins, almonds, cashews, and pistachios.

Sheer Khurma is delicately flavored with cardamom and rosewater. It can be enjoyed either hot or cold. Khoya, or dried milk solids, is optional but recommended, as it gives the dish a richer flavor.

9. Kofta

Kofta is a type of meatball that is popular in Afghanistan. It is also served across the Indian subcontinent, and forms an important part of Middle Eastern, Balkan, South Caucasian, and Central Asian cuisines.

Afghan koftas are usually made from beef or lamb, as well as onion, seasoning, and delicate spices. It is a versatile dish that is often adapted to incorporate regional ingredients and suit seasonal constraints. The dish has a rich history across the Middle East and Persia, where it is regarded as the ultimate comfort food.