How Afghanaid Makes Life Better in Afghanistan

Afghanaid

For over 35 years, the British humanitarian and development organization Afghanaid has been working to improve the lives of millions of Afghans who are vulnerable and underserved. The organization it maintains a presence in some of Afghanistan’s poorest and most remote communities.

Afghanaid develops and runs programs across a broad range of focus areas, including basic service delivery, livelihood enhancement, emergency assistance, and disaster risk reduction. Through the organization’s community-led approach, ordinary Afghans play an important role in their own development. They have the opportunity to become active participants in shaping not only their own futures, but the future of their country as well.

Afghanaid’s recent and current projects include:

1. Restoring Mine-Contaminated Land

For the past two years, Afghanaid has worked in partnership with the HALO Trust, a charity focused on land mine clearance and mine risk education. Due to the decades of conflict it has experienced, Afghanistan is one of the world’s most heavily mined countries. Many regions are still littered with unexploded ordnance.

This makes life extremely difficult for the 80 percent of Afghans who rely on agriculture for their livelihoods. When land cannot be used for crops or grazing because of land mine contamination, whole communities are trapped in poverty and lives are put at risk on a daily basis.

Afghanaid is working to address this issue by coming to areas that the HALO Trust has cleared of mines and unexploded ordnance. It then helps local families rebuild their livelihoods by making good use of their cleared land.

In Samagan and Logar provinces, for example, Afghanaid has provided training in improved agricultural techniques, orchard and greenhouse management, and poultry rearing to nearly 3,000 people. The organization has also supplied the technical assistance and tools needed to transform this previously dangerous land into a valuable, productive resource.

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2. Improving Livestock and Animal Welfare

Most families and households in rural Afghanistan rely on animals, whether for food, transportation, or economic livelihood. Despite this dependence, however, few Afghans have the skills, knowledge, or resources to provide proper care for their animals. In addition, access to experienced veterinarians is rare in remote regions.

As a result, the well-being of many animals is seriously compromised. This negatively impacts both the animals themselves and the people who rely on them.

To help improve animal welfare in rural Afghanistan, Afghanaid recently launched a new partnership with the international equine welfare charity Brooke. This collaborative project will see Afghanaid working in Daykundi province to provide mentorship and specialized training to vets as well as education for farmers regarding the benefits of good animal welfare and the importance of veterinary services.

The organization will also teach farmers critical animal husbandry skills, such as appropriate animal handling, proper housing and feeding, and the identification of diseases. The aim of this initiative is to create a “virtuous cycle” in which improvements to animal welfare lead to greater productivity, which in turn leads to greater prosperity.

3. Responding to Severe Drought

Recent years have seen Afghanistan struggling with severe drought. Because of the resulting water shortage, crop yield has been much lower than usual for the past several seasons. As a result, many rural households have insufficient food for either themselves or their livestock. This has led to significant income reduction and has greatly increased vulnerability to environmental and economic crises.

This devastating situation has left thousands of Afghan families in need of urgent humanitarian assistance. In coordination with the World Food Programme and local partners in Afghanistan, Afghanaid has worked to provide essential food and supplies to nearly 11,000 struggling families in Ghor province, which has been one of the regions hit hardest by drought.

With this assistance, these households can stave off hunger and malnutrition. In addition, they can avoid the negative coping strategies (such as selling off livestock at a very low price) that are unfortunately common in these extreme situations.

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4. Promoting Sustainable Use of Natural Resources

When Afghan families in rural areas need food, water, fuel, medicine, and construction materials, they often turn to the forests, rangelands, and rivers that surround them. However, over the years, a lack of proper regulation and oversight of these resources has led to severe depletion and deterioration of many of these natural systems.

Today, the strain on Afghanistan’s natural ecosystems is even further exacerbated by increasing pressure from rapid population growth, rising land prices, climate change, and recurring natural disasters. This is not only problematic from an environmental point of view, but a social one as well. Resource scarcity is often a significant factor in ethnic, political, and regional conflicts.

To help transform scarce natural resources into sustainable assets, Afghanaid is embarking on a major four-year project in collaboration with the Liaison Office, an Afghan NGO, with support from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation. Taking place in Daykundi province, the project will support 4,500 rural families as they learn to more effectively manage the natural resources they depend on.

A key element of the initiative will be the creation and training of local rangeland management associations. This will help communities work together to manage rangelands in a way that is equitable, inclusive, and sustainable.

This New Project Is Improving Health Care Quality in Afghanistan

As Afghanistan works to rebuild itself after many years of conflict, the country’s health care system remains an area of concern. Despite recent significant improvements, access to health care remains a challenge for many Afghans, particularly those living in remote or rural communities. In addition, the outdated infrastructure, lack of critical amenities and facilities, and inadequate opportunities for medical training that are standard in most parts of Afghanistan mean that it can be difficult for providers to deliver health care beyond the most basic services.

However, Afghanistan’s health care system is set to get a major boost over the next few years through the Sehatmandi Project, a large-scale program launched in the summer of 2018 that aims to improve access to and quality of health care services across the country. Here are four things you need to know about this important project.

It will cover the entire country.

Many of the development programs or initiatives that deal with health care in Afghanistan do so in very targeted areas, often concentrating either on Kabul or on rural areas in the north of the country. The Sehatmandi Project is exceptional in that its scope includes 31 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces. This means that Afghans all around the country will be able to benefit from the cohesive and holistic improvements to Afghanistan’s health care system that the project aims to implement. In addition, some of the project’s key focus areas include offering underserved populations beneficial services such as nutrition management and family planning programs.

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It is supported by a variety of national and international partners.

The Sehatmandi Project is a major, multi-year initiative with a budget to match: the total cost for the program’s three years of operation is estimated at US$600 million.

This cost will be covered by grants from three major funding entities:

The Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF)—Established in 2002, this multidonor trust fund is supported by 34 international donors under the overall management of the World Bank. It is one of the most important entities supporting Afghanistan’s ongoing rebuilding and development process.

The International Development Association (IDA)—Another arm of the World Bank, the IDA provides loans and grants to some of the world’s poorest countries, with the aim of boosting economic growth and lifting these nations out of poverty.

The Global Financing Facility (GFF)—This multi-stakeholder partnership helps governments of low- and lower-middle income countries to prioritize and finance their citizens’ health and nutrition.

In addition to these three major funders, the Sehatmandi Project involves many other administrative and operational partners, including Afghanistan’s Ministry of Public Health and Health Works, a global NGO based in the Netherlands.

It aims to build on the successes of a previous program.

The Sehatmandi Project is a follow-up to the System Enhancement for Health Action in Transition (SEHAT) program, another initiative operated by Afghanistan’s Ministry of Public Health and supported by IDA and ARTF.

Running from January 2014 to June 2018, SEHAT aimed to expand the scope, quality, and coverage of health care services provided to Afghans, especially vulnerable and underserved populations. A key goal of SEHAT was to allow health facilities across Afghanistan to deliver a basic package of health service (BPHS) and an essential package of hospital service (EPHS). The successes of the SEHAT program have laid an important foundation for the Sehatmandi Project, which can now pick up where the earlier program left off and take its accomplishments to the next level.

Some of the most important achievements of the SEHAT program include the following:

Better health services in Nangarhar province—SEHAT oversaw new health initiatives in each of Nangarhar province’s 22 districts. For example, with the support of the SEHAT program, personnel at the Kama District Hospital were able to upgrade their skills and provide better care to patients, and the hospital itself received a second ambulance and a power generator.

The Kabul Urban Health Project—The Rahman Mina Hospital, a Kabul hospital that serves hundreds of thousands of the city’s residents, benefited from extensive renovations and new equipment provided under SEHAT. In addition, the hospital was able to increase its supply of critical medicines, and hospital staff received training on a new health management information system, which improved the facility’s operational efficiency.

It now includes a pay-for-performance component.

In early 2019, Aga Khan Health Services (AKHS) took over the management of health care facilities in two Afghan provinces under the umbrella of the Sehatmandi Project. In this new role, AKHS will be responsible for two provincial hospitals, five district hospitals, 24 comprehensive health centers, 158 basic and primary health centers, and more than 1,000 village health posts in the provinces of Bamyan and Badakhshan.

Interestingly, AKHS plans to operate its portion of the health system using a pay-for-performance model, which will see health service providers compensated for meeting pre-established benchmarks, including numbers of antenatal and postnatal care visits, numbers of immunized infants, and quantity and quality of major surgeries.

Spotlight on the Chihilsitoon Garden Restoration Project

The Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC), one of the affiliate agencies of the Aga Khan Development Network, has a long history of supporting and working on cultural restoration and rehabilitation projects in some of Afghanistan’s most important cities. In fall 2018, AKTC celebrated the completion of its most ambitious project yet: the restoration of Chihilsitoon Garden, the largest historic public garden in Kabul. Read on for a closer look at this exceptional rehabilitation project.

What is Chihilsitoon Garden?

The historic Chihilsitoon Garden and Palace occupy a 12.5-hectare site in the Afghan capital of Kabul. Originally created as a royal garden in the 19th century, the park became state property in the early 20th century. During this part of its history, Chihilsitoon Garden welcomed visiting international dignitaries such as US President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev. Chihilsitoon Garden was severely damaged and looted during periods of unrest in Afghanistan, and the neglected site was left in disrepair for more than two decades.

The goal of the Chihilsitoon Garden rehabilitation project was to restore this once-beautiful site to its former glory and, in so doing, provide Kabul’s approximately 4.5 million residents with more space for recreational and communal activities, add much-needed green space to the city to help improve its air quality and climate, and provide the local population with jobs and the opportunity to acquire new skills. Now that the restoration is complete, the garden will be managed by the recently formed, independent Kabul Historic Gardens Trust (a new iteration of the Bagh-e Babur Trust, which has been sustainably operating the historic site of Babur’s Gardens for over 10 years).

What work was carried out during the Chihilsitoon Garden restoration?

The Chihilsitoon Garden restoration involved extensive rehabilitation work on virtually all aspects of the site. Particular projects included:

Extensive landscaping of outdoor space—The heart of the restored Chihilsitoon Garden site is a historic formal axial garden (a type of symmetrical design commonly used in traditional Islamic gardens), which is surrounded by areas of dense landscape and open lawns. Radiating outwards from this garden is a network of paths and trails that link and encompass a variety of spatial experiences, including group picnic areas; an outdoor amphitheater; and the historic formal promenade, which features the garden’s now-restored, fully functional original marble fountains. As part of this extensive landscaping work, more than 5,000 new trees were planted throughout the site.

The creation of new buildings and amenities for public use—One of the main functions of the restored Chihilsitoon Garden is to serve as a multi-purpose gathering place for communal events of all kinds. To this end, a number of new public buildings were constructed throughout the park, including an exhibition hall; a 300-seat auditorium; buildings for administration, maintenance, and visitor management; and a multi-purpose facility created inside the reconstructed historic Chihilsitoon Palace. To complement the garden’s historical legacy, these contemporary buildings were designed in keeping with traditional vernacular style and constructed using local building methods and materials. (Interestingly, the main building material used was rammed earth: highly suitable for the region’s climatic and ecological environment, rammed earth has been used for construction in Afghanistan for two millennia. In Chihilsitoon Garden, the newly constructed rammed earth buildings were reinforced with bamboo trees and steel rebar to improve earthquake resistance.)

The creation of sites and facilities for sports activities—Chihilsitoon Garden is also envisioned as the home of a variety of sports and outdoor recreation activities. A distinct zone in the restored park contains cricket batting areas, outdoor volleyball courts, and two mini football fields. A building with indoor changing facilities and showers was also constructed to improve the park’s capacity to host competitive sports matches.

Revenue-generating amenities—Part of the Chihilsitoon Garden restoration project was to build in sources of income generation that could eventually help the park to become financially self-sustaining. For example, the garden now includes retail units, food kiosks, and restaurants that can be operated or rented out to generate ongoing revenue. The garden is also home to a commercial horticulture nursery, which can generate revenue in addition to maintaining the stock of trees and plants within the garden.

Utility upgrades—Careful consideration was given to the question of utilities in the garden during the restoration. While provisions have been made for on-site utilities, the garden has been designed to necessitate limited use of water and electricity due to features like septic systems that filter wastewater through subsurface leach fields.

What other partners supported the Chihilsitoon Garden restoration?

The Aga Khan Trust for Culture worked closely with many partners and supporters to complete the restoration of Chihilsitoon Garden and Palace. These include Kabul Municipality, the Afghan Ministries of Culture and Urban Development, and many local communities in Kabul. Funding for the project was provided by the German Federal Foreign Office through the KfW Development Bank.